News

Jul 10, 2017
Summer Days Family Fest
Jul 22, 2015

The Sandusky County Department of Job and Family Services along with the eight counties listed below implemented a call center know as COLLABOR8. These nine (9) JFS Departments share a telephone and imaging system between counties to service public assistance consumers.

Aug 29, 2013

A Sandusky County Grand Jury recently indicted Fremont resident, Kelly Provonsha, on charges of tampering with records and grand theft.

Nov 7, 2012
Child Support Web Portal Now Available
 

Tips for Being a Nurturing Parent

One of the most important things you can do to prevent child abuse is to build a positive relationship with your own children.

Help your children feel loved and secure.
We can all take steps to improve our relationship with our children:

  • Make sure children know you love them, even when they do something wrong.
  • Encourage your children. Praise their achievements and talents.
  • Spend time with your children. Do things together that you all enjoy.

Seek help if you need it.
Problems such as unemployment, marital tension, or a child with special needs can add to family tension. And parenting is a challenging job on its own. No one expects you to know how to do it all. If you think stress may be affecting the way you treat your child, or if you want the extra support that all parents need at some point, try the following:

  • Talk to someone.  Tell a friend, healthcare provider, or a leader in your faith community about your concerns. Or join a self-help group for parents.

 

  • Get counseling.  Individual or family counseling can help you learn healthy ways to communicate with each other.

 

  • Take a parenting class.  Nobody was born knowing how to be a good parent. Parenting classes can give you the skills you need to raise a happy, healthy child.

 

  • Accept help.  You don't have to do it all. Accept offers of help from friends, family, or neighbors. And don't be afraid to ask for help if you need it.

Adapted from gateways to prevention 2003 child abuse prevention community resource packet
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